Warren Deaths by Cause

Compiled by Historian Wesley Arnold

This report is based on actual death records of Warren Township.


Before 1900 although many people survived to old age the greatest numbers died before 50.

Over 50 percent of children did not make it to age 21.

Many women died in childbirth.

Many adults and children died in the summer of “Summer Complaint” which was caused by food that had partly spoiled.

Nearly all died of diseases we now have cures for.


Warren Township deaths 1867-1900 showed the following causes listed by frequency


136 unknown most of these were stillborns or under a week old

97 consumption (now known as TB

85 other some of these were unreadable writing

58 Diphtheria

54 heart disease

45 old age

40 accident

39 summer complaint spoiled food

39 scarlet fever

26 typhoid fever

24 inflammation of bowels

24 inflammation of lungs

23 brain disease

22 dropsy

18 cramps

17 cancer

16 bright disease

16 inflammation other than bowels or lungs

14 dysentery

14 cholera

14 paralysis

13 bronchitis

12 infantium

11 grip

11 suicide

11 croup

10 apoplexy

10 fever

9 small pox

9 fits

7 childbirth

6 inflammation of stomach

6 confinement

6 measles

5 blood poisoning

5 rheumatism

5 Tumor

3 malaria

3 bleeding

3 asthma

3 murder

3 palsey

2 whooping cough

2 insanity

2 convulsions

1 scarletina


Before 1900 most doctors were untrained and most medicines non existent or useless.

After 1900 the numbers of child deaths gradually declined and

deaths from the following diseases also gradually declined: Diphtheria, summer complain, scarlet fever, typhoid fever, inflammation, dropsy, bright disease, dropsy, dysentery, cholera, infantium,

grip, croup, small pox, fits, childbirth, confinement, measles, blood poisoning, malaria, whooping cough, convulsions, scarletina and deaths caused by horses.

Other causes increased such as “killed by cars”, auto accidents, airplane accidents, and deaths caused by pollution and cancer.


Today the leading causes of death are

Heart disease:

Cancer:

Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases):

Chronic lower respiratory diseases:

Accidents (unintentional injuries):

Alzheimer's disease:

Diabetes:

Influenza and Pneumonia:

Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis:

Septicemia:

[and war]

above from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/lcod.htm